Agile Learning: What is that?

hi

vertaling naar het Nederlands

One long and cosy evening I went through Learning Agility, a 30-minute course on LinkedIn Learning. I was sitting in my favourite armchair, a cherished legacy of my greatgrandmother’s. I had inherited it as a worn-out seat, having intensively been used by 3 ancestral generations.

Anyway, I went through this interesting course by Gary Bolles, in which he elaborates upon how to get people on an agile learning path.  May I highly recommend every L&D-professional to sit back in his favourite chair and enjoy this microlearning course about agile learning?

During my learning process my thoughts kept wandering to my Best Friend Forever Elly, who’s always  a bit embarrassed about her education level.  Unfortunately, Elly can’t look back on a smooth childhood, nor youth… Like for so many people, life got in her way.
But when I look at her career, I can only see an impressive learning journey. Together with her husband she set up a small tyre centre, which has grown into  into a 10-person profitable and innovative company in the province of Limburg, Belgium. She has built up an impressive palmares of qualifications in French, accountancy, social legislation,  administration and typewriting, Photoshop and other computer programmes.  You name it; she has the certificate.

The question is: How did Elly get this done, next to a busy job as a co-business manager and an unwavering commitment to her family and friends?
How do people realise their learning aspirations although there’s always so much work to do?

Gary Bolles draws an interesting learning path in this 30′ minute course. He shares his insights on why and how we learn things and tells us about the phases of learning. Particularly interesting I found the middle part of his presentation, in which he suggests us to develop a learning wish list and learning plan and how to develop a learning portfolio. Elly may not have established a formal learning wish list, but it can certainly help learners to focus on their goals. And my friend definitely knows about planning, regarding her busy professional and private engagements.

In my opinion, it always comes down to intrinsic motivation.  You cannot be obliged to learn, that’s a fact. Whether for private or professional reasons, if you really, really, really want to get better in your job, or in a hobby, or in life, you just start working at that, often quite unconsciously and in a most agile and self-managing way. Of course you will need a planning. Probably it’s one of the main reasons why so many intentions aren’t fulfilled in the long run.

So, according to Gary a learning professional might indeed provide tools to help learners to

  • find and formulate their intrinsic  motives
  • build a learning wish list and a convenient and individual learning plan

and in this way develop their own portfolio in a self-steering, self-managing way. But in my opinion the secret to success lies in the people around this learning person, the friends and family, the colleagues and peers who they can trust, who they can discuss problems with, who they can ask for information and feedback. A close group op people who gives support when necessary. And there’s a definite need to work at that.

My favourite armchair

As for the armchair: I just love to give old stuff a new life, especially old family stuff with a story. So I refurbished this piece of furniture myself. Easy,  because I really, really, really wanted to learn how to do it.

Intrinsic motivation can get you so far… with the help of Pinterest and YouTube…

 

 

Grtz

Annemie

 

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